Experts’ Corner: Identifying a Play Before It Even Happens

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By Josh Freedland

The Experts’ Corner is a new series on NeuroTracker.net that features expert opinions from various fields. This week we are joined by Josh Freedland, a former collegiate football player and current National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer. Read his full biography at the end of this article.

You’re probably thinking: “Identifying a play before it happens? Impossible.” But if you study enough and know which cues to look for, yes, you just may be able to figure out what the offense is doing before they even snap the ball.

The Scenario

There are 10 minutes left in the 4th quarter. The opposing team is losing 10-7 and is currently on offense, about to face 3rd-and-8 from their own 25-yard line. The offense lines up in a Shotgun Doubles formation (2 wide receivers spread out to either side of the quarterback with a running back flanked next to the quarterback). You’re the linebacker. What are the steps you take in identifying the play coming your way in just a few seconds?

Shotgun Doubles Offensive Formation

Shotgun Doubles Formation

Step 1: Reading the Situation
  • Down and Distance: It’s 3rd-and-8 for the offense. On any given play, the offense has two options, run or pass. Defensively, you’re trying to analyze the situation and narrow down which option is more likely. The probability of gaining 8 yards on a run player is lower than on a pass play. You also want to take into consideration that it’s 3rd down, which means that if the opposing team fails to gain the 8 yards, they will have to consider punting.
  • Score and Time: Although the offense is losing in the 4th quarter, there is still plenty of time remaining on the clock. It makes sense for the offense to punt on 4th down if they fail to convert on 3rd down.
Step 2: Analyzing the Formation

Running backs usually run from behind the quarterback for a successful handoff.

Running backs usually run from behind the quarterback for a successful handoff.

  • Running Back: The depth of the running back can be an important clue. If the RB is deeper in the formation than the Quarterback, he might be preparing for a hand-off. Otherwise, he’s most likely to be utilized as a blocker in case of a blitz.
  • Wide Receivers: Who is on the field and who isn’t? Wide receivers vary a lot but they usually fall into either the small and quick players category or the bigger, blocking type receivers. When smaller and quicker receivers are on the field it tends to mean a passing play is about to happen.
Step 3: Experience
  • Body language: Intensively studying film can help in gaining knowledge of certain players. This is obviously easier to do at the professional level but this is where a person’s cognitive ability to pay attention and interpret visual cues becomes important. For example, minor details such as nervous body ticks can be a crucial indication. In the 2015 AFC Championship Game, the Broncos discovered that the Patriots’ center moves his head in a certain way immediately before every snap. This helped the defense time the snap perfectly – leading to a total of 4 sacks and 17 hits against Tom Brady.
  • Statistics: Most of the time scouting reports and analytics can provide you with an additional edge. No matter who the coach or what the situation is, human beings tend to call plays that they’ve already had success with over a long-period of time. By simply using numbers, you can make an educated guess, with a good probability, of a play going one way or another. But it’s important not to over-rely on statistics.
Train Your Brain. Elevate Your Game.

Good players have the physical attributes to compete and contribute to the team. Great players differentiate themselves by their hard work, dedication, and mental training. They spend hours studying film to pick up on the smallest cues that could give them an edge over their opponent. They are also able to mentally process a wealth of information in just fractions of a second so that they can make quick decisions under immense pressure.

Great players take their game to the next level by having superior on-field awareness and mental stamina to make the ‘clutch‘ play when the other players have exhausted their mental capabilities.

Would you like to get in touch with Josh? You can find him training aspiring and professional athletes to take their game to the next level at Brain & Body Performance Clinic in Boston. Find out more details by visiting http://www.brainbodyboston.com/

 


Josh Freedland is the President/CEO of Brain & Body Performance: New England’s Leader in Enhanced Neuroplasticity & Performance Training. Brain & Body Performance Applies Cutting-Edge Technology and Specialized Programs to Increase Mental Focus, Performance, and Recovery. He is also a National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer, and currently does does both physical and cognitive training with high school, college, and professional athletes. In addition to working with athletes, he also works with clients who have ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Post-Concussion Syndrome, and Cognitive Decline. You can read more articles from Josh by visiting his blog at www.brainbodyblog.com

A graduate of Bates College, Josh received his BA in Psychology with a concentration in Biology and Health. As a starting linebacker on the Bates College Football team, Josh pursued his interests in sport psychology on and off the field. After experiencing a severe concussion during his Junior year in college, he researched controversial brain injury studies which led him to his thesis topic, “Measuring the attitudes and the likelihood of concussion reporting by testing implicit attitudes in collegiate football players.” He presented his research at the Association for Applied Sport Psychology Northeast Regional Conference at Springfield College during the Spring of 2015.

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