NeuroTracker Being Put Through its Paces at the University of Regina

The NeuroTracker Team Performance, Wellness Leave a Comment

The Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies (KHS) at the University of Regina are really getting the most out of 3 NeuroTracker Pro systems across an impressive array of applied studies. Concussion testing, athlete performance enhancement and referee training are just some of the research projects they’re into.

Firstly over 300 hundreds athletes are undergoing training and testing programs incorporating performance baselines as part of a broader neuropsychological protocols assessment. This advanced approach will include cerebrovascular measures of changes in brain blood flow and oxygenation.

Secondly, ice hockey officials have also been part of ground-breaking KHS research to see if NeuroTracker training can enhance a range of officiating skills deemed to be most critical by supervisors of referees from the Saskatchewan Hockey Association. An active group of referees underwent training through the NeuroTracker Learning System, performing a total of 60 sessions while sitting down, standing, cycling on a stationary bike, and finally on a skating machine. They were then compared to a passive control group via on-ice officiating performance. The experimental group was found to have significantly better performance outcomes in competition assessments, which are now being analysed to investigate which specific aspects were most impacted. This research is planned to expand into soccer and football officiating.
Lastly, if the above wasn’t enough already, KHS are using NeuroTracker in the Motivation for Active Living Laboratory (MALL) to study potential benefits with non-athletic populations as part of their cutting-edge research programs.

It’s extremely impressive to see a single cognitive training technology being put to so many uses, and we hope to bring you insights from the lead KHS researchers in upcoming expert’s corner blogs.

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The NeuroTracker Team